From The Archives: Harry Caray

April 4, 2013

Harry Caray, born Harry Christopher Carabina, (March 1, 1914 – February 18, 1998) was an American baseball broadcaster on radio and television. He covered four Major League Baseball teams, beginning with a long tenure calling the games of the St. Louis Cardinals, then the Oakland Athletics (for one year) and the Chicago White Sox (for eleven years), before ending his career as the announcer for the Chicago Cubs. (Wikipedia)

His famous seventh-inning stretch singing of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” began during his tenure with the White Sox. Caray enthusiastically led the song’s singing during the seventh-inning stretch, using a hand-held microphone and holding it out outside the booth window. And, he inserted the home team’s name for “the home team” in the song’s lyric, a ritual still practiced by many baseball fans around the country. Many of these performances began with Caray speaking directly to the baseball fans in attendance either about the state of the day’s game, or the Chicago weather, while the park organ held the opening chord of the song. Read the rest of this entry »

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A Tribute to Harry Caray

March 3, 2010

Harry Caray, born Harry Christopher Carabina, (March 1, 1914 – February 18, 1998) was an American baseball broadcaster on radio and television. He covered four Major League Baseball teams, beginning with a long tenure calling the games of the St. Louis Cardinals, then the Oakland Athletics (for one year) and the Chicago White Sox (for eleven years), before ending his career as the announcer for the Chicago Cubs. (Wikipedia)

His famous seventh-inning stretch singing of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” began during his tenure with the White Sox.  Caray enthusiastically led the song’s singing during the seventh-inning stretch, using a hand-held microphone and holding it out outside the booth window. And, he inserted the home team’s name for “the home team” in the song’s lyric, a ritual still practiced by many baseball fans around the country.  Many of these performances began with Caray speaking directly to the baseball fans in attendance either about the state of the day’s game, or the Chicago weather, while the park organ held the opening chord of the song. Read the rest of this entry »